Gaining an understanding of different cultures one plate at a time!

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Food Photography: The Harvest Table

This past fall I had the absolute pleasure of teaching a class with a friend of mine, Jenn Bakos of Jennifer Bakos Photography. Jenn is someone I look up to a great deal, not only is she kind hearted, but she’s also extremely talented and puts her heart and soul into everything she creates. We had taught a two hour mini class at The Studio of Photographic Arts aka. SOPHA’s Annual Down on the farm class in July and had such a great time doing it we jumped on the chance to teach a class this fall.

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Loubieh bi Zeit (Lebanese "Green Beans in Oil")

Recently, my husband and I stopped eating meat. To be perfectly honest, he’s a lot more disciplined about it than I am. If I'm out with others, I bend the rules a bit and find myself going for short rib tacos instead of the veggie option. As a food lover, swearing off meat altogether just doesn’t work for me. I am interested in all sorts of food and will try just about anything put in front of me.

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The American Table: Breaking Bread with Nomad Bakery

I spent some time with Cheryl Holbert of Nomad Bakery and her family. I met her daughter, Kara, in college and grew close to her and her parents over the years. It was a great opportunity to catch up, eat delicious food, and discuss our feelings on everything going on in our country and the world beyond. My love for food has grown over the years, and it was really wonderful to watch Cheryl take her passion for bread baking and turn it into a successful and amazing business. She was named one of Dessert Professional's online magazine’s top ten bread bakers in North America 2016.

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Kishik: Not for everyone, but definitely for me.

Italy has polenta, the south has grits, but Lebanon has something similar in idea but a completely different execution. Kishik is a lebanese porridge, what makes it different from the two mentioned is its ingredients and what is done to create it. Kishik is made with Bulgar Wheat fermented in milk and yogurt (Laban) and is created by mixing the two ingredients and letting them ferment over several days.

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About Me

As a Lebanese American, preserving culture has been a high priority in my life. My respect for my heritage and it’s traditions has brought along a mutual interest and respect for other cultures. Through this blog, my goal is learn something new about the people around us while also partaking and creating delicious dishes that represents their cultural identities.

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